7 Problems Creative Entrepreneurs Have Growing Their Businesses (and how to solve them)

 

How good are you at business development?

I used to suck.

But years of growing my own freelance business taught me a few things about getting new clients.

Some of them I put into white-papers like the First Meeting Success Formula, which you can grab a free copy of here.

And all of them I share with my students…

We held a seminar recently with members of my Business Accelerator to handle some of their most common issues.

It was so productive that I thought it worth sharing some of what we covered with you.

Before the seminar, I collected a ton of questions from all our members.

Then I condensed them down to a few main problems that we all seemed to be experiencing.

These questions are pretty common; I’ve come across them many times over my 25-year career as a business consultant.

Hopefully, my answers can help you out too:

1. How do I craft a better cold email to clients and prospects?

I don’t recommend using cold email if you can help it.

Years ago it used to be more effective one-to-one but these days cold email is pretty ineffective.

This counts even more if you’re stretched for time.

I use Twitter to break the ice, which works well for me.

You do need a compelling reason to connect with them, not just ‘hey check out my portfolio’.

Have a compelling reason and it can open the door to an email.

To be fair, this can work with cold email too, except that your reason has to be super compelling.

You have to research that client and that person pretty extensively to do it well.

Detailed client personas will allow you to craft copy in your cold emails that will get much higher responses.

This works well when you have a specific person to connect with, but cold emailing has largely passed its time.

2. How do I strike a balance between getting the work and doing the work?

When your sales cycle leaves you no room to get work while you’re doing your work, it can be stagnating.

This needs to be your top priority – set aside time for it each week, no matter what.

Don’t skimp – it really is the most important part of your business.

The more consistently you can do it, the more effective you’ll be at it.

So block off the time and stick to it. I cannot stress the importance of this enough.

The more you do it, the better you’ll be at identifying ways to make it more effective.

For example, Friday afternoons seem to be a good time for me to connect with people.

Seems contrary to belief but it works for me.

Whatever it is, finding that set time will keep your momentum.

Want to know the formula to successful first client meetings? Download your free copy here.

Look for ongoing clients, rather than one off projects, where you can.

I’ll cover that in another blog post.

For now, just try to look for opportunities for work to develop, or long-term needs of the client you could satisfy.

3. Referrals and personal connections etc. seem to be our best source of leads – what can we do to increase the number of leads we get without attending a tonne of useless evening events?

In my experience, most freelance creatives or small agencies don’t do a great deal of marketing of themselves, for exactly this reason.

Or at least, they don’t do it consistently.

What you want to do is make sure you’re finding and working with your ideal client.

This has to start with getting a good idea of who you work best with, and who is more likely to have a problem you can solve.

Then you need to get on their radar.

You need to find where they hang out and make yourself known there.

This could be certain areas of social media. It could be specific niche events. It all depends on your ideal client persona.

Idea client personas are key to this – so you have to start with this marketing essential

Like it or not, if you want to get more clients coming to you for work, you do need to spend time on your marketing.

4. What is the best way to get clients in a new/different market?

The key with entering a new vertical is always positioning.

You need to make sure that you understand the problems of your potential clients in this niche.

Really well.

Better than the existing competitors in the sector, if you can. If you want to succeed in a niche, you need to know your audience as well as you know yourself.

It sounds really hard and scary, but it is so essential for you to buckle down and do your research.

Know anybody in the market you want to enter? Take them out for coffee and grill them for info.

Whatever it takes, for success in any marketplace, you need to first understand your audience.

5. When planning a new launch how do you work out the best channel to market in with the most success..i.e…ppc/social/email?

Assuming that you’ve put together personas for your ideal client, this shouldn’t be too hard.

So it’s largely a matter of getting down to your marketing strategy.

You ideal client persona will give you hints about where to target.

For example, which social media channel will be more effective, or keywords to target on Adwords.

The best thing to do is to use them to put together a basic marketing strategy.

PPC ads can quickly become very expensive, so it’s important to have clearly defined budget and goals.

Sit down and put together a simple plan, define a budget, some goals and a time period, and really track your results.

When your campaign is underway you’ll be able to tell if it’s cost effective or not and adjust your strategy to fit.

6. How does an introvert begin to develop business?

I get asked this question a surprising amount.

I think this is because a lot of people who are on the more creative and artistic side see themselves as more introverted too.

Most of the time I tell these people it’s a great idea to become part of a business group.

Even better if it’s one with potential clients in it.

There are a lot of different techniques I could teach you to help you get used to breaking the ice with people.

Too many for this post.

So join a business group with like-minded people, and commit to attending regularly.

As you feel more comfortable with these people, you’ll start to find it easier to get into the conversation.

I’ve put together a formula for successful first client meetings, which you can grab a free copy of here

Really if you just keep showing up, it’s great practice for meeting people.

It’s going to be hard to start, but as you get out of your comfort zone and get used to talking about your business, you’ll reap the rewards.

7. How can we deal with pricing with clients? So many clients think graphic design is easy/always want it never yesterday/never want to pay more…

Ok, this is the big one. It comes in so many different forms. But it’s always there.

It’s probably the single most common question I get asked by clients and Business Accelerator members alike.

Many people aren’t going to like this answer, but it’s the only thing I’ve found effective over the years.

It comes in two parts:

1. Become a problem solver/increase your value

You really have to work on your research here.

Find out what their problems are.

You need to consider yourself as a problem solver, not just a designer.

Most businesses don’t care about whether something looks good unless it solves a problem for them.

That’s where you come in.

By doing your research by asking the right questions, like the three killer questions I talk about here, you’ll be able to offer so much more to your clients.

Think of it like back pain. Seriously.

If you’ve ever had back pain, you’ll know what a relief it is to find a practitioner, whatever they specialize in, that can help with the pain.

When that pain goes, you don’t care if it’s a chiropractor, a physic, or tiny needles that did it.

You’re just happy the pain is gone, pay whatever it costs, and book your next appointment.

So imagine how delighted your average business owner will be if you design them a good-looking website, that also helps to increase their conversions (or whatever their problem is).

If you’re delivering that kind of value, you’ll find your clients much happier to part with their cash.

2. Don’t be afraid to say, “No”

The second part of this answer is much harder to do.

Especially if you’re struggling.

Usually, even if you’re not.

Saying no is one of the hardest things to do, in any situation, but one that is well worth practicing.

Not only do various studies that show it can actually make you more likable, it can help your business grow too.

Analyzing your existing or past clients, and creating an ideal future client profile, will help you a lot with this.

It will help you identify when a client isn’t going to respect the work you do or want to pay your prices for it.

We all struggle to turn away work.

But if you’ve ever been in the unfortunate position of wishing you’d never dealt with a client, you’ll understand the power of the word, ‘no’.

So don’t be afraid of turning down work that doesn’t pay what you need, or with clients you suspect will be trouble down the line.

It just isn’t worth it.

Hopefully, you’ve found some of my answers useful.

I’ll be adding plenty more articles and resources here over the coming months, so make sure you subscribe to get more!

 

Want to read more? Check out my 4 Steps to a Winning Freelance Proposal post