Want More Referrals? Look at your client lifecycle

The Referral Engine by John Jantsch is a book that was recommended to me by one of the members of our Business Accelerator Community. Jantsch is the bestselling author of Duct Tape Marketing.

The referral Engine outlines an approach to marketing that moves away from complicated marketing campaigns (hallelujah!) and instead focuses on personal interactions with customers through social media and friend-to-friend word of mouth.

It’s a great read but if you don’t have time, I want to share the part about the ideal customer lifecycle. I’m so on the same page with it that I want to share the main points here because he explains it so perfectly.

Janstch talks about 7 stages of referral development in the customer lifecycle: Know, Like, Trust, Try, Buy, Repeat, Refer. We all hear about know like and trust all the time but he’s added a few more stages to it.

Know
This is the initial introduction to your business. The cliché that you only get one chance to make a good first impression applies here. The best way to start a relationship is to communicate a clear brand or point of difference that is designed to attract your ideal customer or referral source. AND…it’s essential to have narrowly defined what an ideal customer looks like so you can speak directly to the customer in all your communications.

Want to know if you’re making a lasting impression on potential clients? Grab the Brand Impact Scorecard and start making a bigger impact. 

 

Like
Once a prospect is aware of your business, they can and should be led to digging deeper to learn more. This is where you start to form a  connection through your content (blog, social etc.)

Trust
After following your content for a while or attending a talk or webinar, trust begins to form and this is where they’ll want to talk to you or meet you. I find that referrals don’t always jump right in, they want to go through the know, like, process first.

Try
I love this one. Create a way for clients to sample your business. Offering a low-risk trial can do a lot for your business. Here’s an example he gave in the book: An architect created a $499 feasibility audit for builders and property owners to get a quick assessment before investing in a full-fledged set of plans. This is the beginning of a relationship and if the architect does a good job, chances are that the client will enroll for the big project. What can you offer as a taste? I recently came up with the idea of 2 coaching sessions for $500 so people could get a taste of my coaching before they make a bigger commitment.

Want to know if you’re making a lasting impression on potential clients? Grab the Brand Impact Scorecard and start making a bigger impact. 

 

Buy
This is where they buy the main product or service. Of course, you need to make sure people like it and you deliver as promised but you want it to get people talking as well. How you orient your client once they buy is super important. You need to look at each touchpoint of their experience from the time they sign the contract to the delivery of the end product and beyond. How you communicate, how you get paid etc. are all the things that make you referral-worthy.

When I sign up a new member to the Business Accelerator, I explain exactly what will happen in detail on the phone, they then receive a welcome email and get put in a group email list so they receive a reminder the day before the group calls as well as the recording the day after the calls. I’ve looked at each touchpoint carefully. I didn’t use to send the call reminder the day before and everyone would be emailing me to find out the Zoom link. Now it all goes out the day before. That’s just one small detail but it makes all the difference.

Do you have an orientation process or a kit of information that goes to all new clients? How can you make it an experience that people can’t wait to share?

Repeat
Doing a good job is only gets you halfway to the referral phase. The key factor in creating repeat sales, expanded product sales, and long-term loyalty is to make sure your clients are getting the most value possible beyond getting what they signed up for. Commit to teaching them the proper way to get the most from what they’ve purchased, share under the hood tips and best practices. Go the extra mile.

This is most important…what follow-up process do you have in place to make sure your clients are getting the value they were hoping for when they signed up for the project? Do you have a results review? I’ve been teaching a brand check-in process where you set some goals at the outset of a branding project and then check-back 6 months to a year later to see how it went. There is very little follow-up in business to actually see how the client is doing or if the work you did had a real impact.

Refer

Your client becomes such an advocate that they act as a salesperson for you. Create a system that makes it easy to refer you. Hold an event that focuses on networking and referral opportunities. Organize a lunch and learn and invite a client to bring someone that they might refer to your firm. What ideas can you think of?

Want to know if you’re making a lasting impression on potential clients? Grab the Brand Impact Scorecard and start making a bigger impact. 

I hope you’ll start looking at your client lifecycle this way. You are probably already doing much of it but there are likely a few new things to incorporate. I know that I already have a few ideas just from writing this!

Why Smart Creative Entrepreneurs Make Plans (and how to make yours for 2018)

If you’re like most creative business owners, you’ve been too busy getting the work done to be worrying about planning for next year. Creative minds thrive on improvising their way to success. If you made it through 2017 without a plan, consider one for 2018?

Most successful creatives eventually learn that it’s the structure and routine of a plan that allows you to be truly successful.

set aside some time for 2018 planning

Download the 2018 Strategic Planning Workbook here

Take the weekly groceries, for example. Whenever I drop into the store to pick up a couple of things, I end up spending $60 on things I definitely didn’t need.

 

However, when I plan the meal and make a list, I spend less money and use everything I bought.

It’s never too late to start planning. You might even enjoy coming up with new processes or strategies to try, new product ideas to test out, or new ways to  get clients.

The hardest part is getting started, right?

One of my favorite lessons from ‘The E-Myth Revisited’, by Michael Gerber, was that planning is the difference between working in your business and working ON your business.

One of them is going to lead to 70 hour weeks and a permanent migraine from the stress. The other leads to greater freedom and more money. Which would you choose?

Planning simply means looking forward a year (or two) and trying to assess where your market is headed, decide where you would like to go, and whether you have the right resources in place.

Planning is your big creative ‘what if’, that helps you figure out what you’re going to be doing the rest of the year. It’s your blueprint for creating a successful and stable business over the next year or more. When you break down your goals into daily tasks, processes or routines, your plan is your ‘how’. But a great plan is so much more than that too.

Download your 2018 Strategic Planning Workbook here

A great plan is your shining light at the end of the tunnel. It’s your reason to keep plugging at something when all seems lost. When you wake up in the morning and ask yourself what could possibly be the need to go to that meeting at 8:45…your plan will be there to remind you of the ‘why’.

‘Hows’ are very easy to come by, but ‘whys’ are much harder to find. Once you have your ‘why’ though, suddenly every decision you made has been made for you. When you have to decide whether to take on a project, or tricky client, or any decision at all, just think back to those yearly goals, your ‘why’ and ask, “Will this help me reach that goal?” You’ll soon know what to do if it doesn’t. How to say NO to a client. 

Your Why should be beyond making money. For example, my Why is to build community and inspire creative entrepreneurship.

Once you decide to start the process, it can be surprisingly fun. It’s a time to do two things you rarely do as a business owner. To really let yourself imagine or dig deeper into your vision for what you really want the business to be. The second, and this is the art and the challenge for most people is to figure out how much of that vision you can realistically expect to achieve and by when.

One of the most useful aspects of a great planning session is that it’s often the first time a creative entrepreneur sits down and actually looks at all the aspects of their business as a whole.

So, great planning starts with a good understanding of your current state of your business.

Download your 2018 Strategic Planning Workbook here

This process is mostly creative.

It can definitely be tricky to stay grounded in the day-to-day of your business and simultaneously critique and envision a better future, but a plan doesn’t have to be set in stone. The more often you come back to reassess your plan, tweak it slightly, change this aspect, reassess this area, the better you’ll become at it.

And if you’re really stuck, you can always book a call with me 🙂

How to find ongoing freelance clients

It’s the freelancers dream: a constantly flowing stream of long-term projects.

Let’s face it, getting started as a freelancer is fairly easy, in the grand scheme of things. Download the Target Audience Worksheet.

Almost anyone with a reasonable skill-set can find a single project to freelance on. Most can easily find two or three. But what really sets apart a successful creative freelancer from the rest is their ability to sustain a steady stream of work (and income).

The goal is reaching that critical point where you have enough ongoing work from freelance clients that you don’t need to spend as much time on proposals etc.

You have more control over your working schedule, and likely a great deal less stress about finances too.

How to get more long-term clients is one of the questions I get asked the most often, so today I’ll go through the process.

One of the most important aspects of this, however, is knowing who your ideal client is. You can figure that out using something like my target audience worksheet, which you can download for free here.

From small seeds, a mighty trunk may grow…

The first thing you have to do is change your perspective a little bit.

Although it may seem logical to look for big projects that will require a lot of work over an extended period, in reality very few clients actually say that upfront.

This is not to say that there aren’t clients out there looking for long-lasting relationships with freelancers who they trust. There are definitely many of them. They just don’t say (or maybe even know it) themselves.

Take, for example, my current web developer/techie freelancer.

When I hired him initially, it was to help fix a couple of issues with my website. I didn’t ask him to help improve and debug it for the next 5 years. I didn’t ask him if he would be available in a year to redesign it.

I was looking for someone who could help me fix a couple of things that had stopped working on the site. The developer I found did a great job, and I enjoyed working with him. So, of course, the next time I needed a change on the site, I emailed him. And the next time.

Later, when I needed a new website and some major changes, we worked together to create a plan of action on a much bigger scale. This was over a year since we had initially started working together. And I don’t foresee any reason I would need to use another developer instead of him in the future.

The mistake most freelancers make when trying to find ongoing work, is turning away the small jobs because they don’t think they’ll get repeat business.

As with anything, start small and scale. The best way to get long-term jobs is to do an amazing job on the small stuff, and nurture your relationships with your clients.

First of all, you’ll be able to easily get the small jobs. And the work you do on that small job will probably be better because you’ll be focused on one task and really solve the problem.

Once the client sees that you do great work and solve their problem, they’ll want to work with you the next time they have an issue. Of course, not all small jobs lead to long-term wins. There are of course certain types of clients that are more likely to ‘convert’ into a longer-term partnership. You wouldn’t propose on the first date right?

Having a good idea of your ideal client, using a detailed target audience or buyer persona, is key here. If you haven’t worked out your target audience yet, you download a ‘Target Audience Worksheet’ here, which should help you work it out.

Compare each client and project as it comes through against your buyer personas, and make sure that ‘having a need for ongoing work’ is one of your qualifiers.

Don’t rush your decision – you never know which small task will turn into an ongoing role and don’t make the mistake of charging too little to get the work. Once you start that way, it’s hard to change it.

The secret every successful freelancer knows is that creating a consistent income stream isn’t about more clients. It’s about building trust with the clients you already have.

Trust can be a hard thing to come by online, and you’d be surprised how many clients you come across have been ‘burnt’ in the past by unscrupulous freelancers or agencies.

Building trust with them won’t just bring you ongoing work from that client – they’ll be so happy to work with you, because they trust you, that they’ll even tell their friends about you. Make them successful and you’re golden!

If you get the chance to work with a great freelancer, you’ll notice it’s a bit like working with a friend, or a close colleague, a partner – someone who really cares about the success of the project and the success of your business.

There’s an old parable about a father who decides to hand down his business to one of his two sons.

He decides to pass it on to the younger son, at which the elder son is outraged; “Father, why would you not give me, your first child, your business?”

To demonstrate, the father sends both of his sons to buy 5 more cows from a neighbouring farmer. The elder son returns with 5 healthy, strong cows, and some small change.

The younger son returns without any cows at all. When the elder son sees this, he begins to crow delightedly, “See Father, you were wrong, he cannot even buy 5 cows!”

So the father asks his younger son why he has not returned with any cattle. The younger son replies, “Well father, there were 5 cattle available for sale, each for $2000, but if we were to buy 6, we would be able to reduce the price by $100 per cow. Also, if we are willing to wait, there will be fresh cattle available for sale, of a stronger, better breed. If we’re in a hurry, we could get them delivered for tomorrow morning.”

The father turns to his older son and says, “That’s why your younger brother is getting the farm.”

Most people only do what they’re asked to do. Those who are actively engaged in a cause will go above and beyond to make it as good as possible.

Think about it like this:

EVERY freelancer can create a decent-looking design for a fair price.

How many will take the time to find out if the design actually achieved  the desired result? Your clients don’t really want a logo, or a website, or a blog post – they want more customers.

Almost everything you do as a freelancer, whether you’re a designer or a developer or a writer, should boil down to what you can do to increase profits for your clients.

This may not always be apparent but you should keep this in the forefront of your mind.

Creating a consistent stream of work as a creative freelancer boils down to this:

1) Change your mindset and go smaller projects where you can get paid fairly. ‘From small seeds, a mighty trunk may grow.’

2) Know who you want to work with. Make sure it’s on things you care about. Don’t work with anyone else. Seriously – just don’t.

3) Commit to the client’s business as if it was your own. Understand and look for ways you can bring value to their business, whether it be in the project itself, or general advice. People will notice when this is genuine.

4) Go above and beyond wherever you can. Note: I didn’t say ‘underpromise and overdeliver’. This is the wrong way to look at it: actually go out there and above and beyond. This bit is actually not too hard if you follow the 3 rules above properly.

5) Focus on building better relationships with your clients, whether that be in-work or out. Send holiday cards, a ‘Happy Birthday’ note. Follow their business and them and check-in to congratulate them on their progress.

I realise that the above probably seems a little ‘easier said than done’. But that’s kind of the point. It’s going to be hard. You’re definitely going to make mistakes.

The most successful freelancers all struggled for the first few years because they made the same mistakes as you. And we’ve all accepted work we knew wouldn’t lead anywhere just for the money.

But as you build a better idea of who and what you want to work for, you’ll get better at finding clients that you can build a long-term relationship with.

And sweat the small stuff even if it doesn’t seem worth it – you’ll build a reputation that will bring you work better than any marketing tactic.

 

Don’t forget to pick up your FREE target audience worksheet here, to help you work out who your ideal client is.